The NBN

‘The National Broadband Network’

The National Broadband Network (NBN) is a project funded by the Australian Federal Government; the aim of which is to provide every Australian home and business with a faster, more reliable broadband internet connection.
NBN Intro
Traditional broadband internet speeds are limited by the copper wire which is used to transport data to and from your home. NBN will raise the bar by using fibre-optic cables to transport data at almost the speed of light.
NBN Speeds
In addition to speed, another advantage which fibre-optic cables have over the traditional copper wires is that fibre-optic cables are far less susceptible to effects of wet weather, lightning, congestion, and erosion; providing users with a more stable and reliable connection.
NBN Connection

Can I get the NBN?

Enter your address into the NBN rollout map to check the status of the rollout at your property.

Lucky enough to have the NBN in your area...
Find the right NBN plan here!

* Please enter your postcode
If the NBN is not in your area yet, we can still help you compare your current ADSL2+, Naked DSL or Cable plan!

What speeds can I get with the NBN?

The table below compares the different NBN speeds available and for reference how long it would roughly take to download a movie for each. Tier 1 is the standard speed that most plans will start at for households with basic internet usage. You can choose to pay more to get the additional speed boosts which is recommended if your household use streaming services and have multiple devices online at the same time.


The NBN Tier 1 (Standard)*
Download Up to 12 Mbps
Upload 1 Mbps
24 minutes
Approx. time to download a 2GB movie


Types of NBN connections



Connected city

How do I get connected
to the NBN?


View Guide
Girl on phone and computer

What happens to my current
connection and home phone?


View Guide

FAQ's

The National Broadband Network (NBN) is a project funded by the Australian Federal Government; the aim of which is to provide every Australian home and business with a faster, more reliable broadband internet connection.

Traditional broadband internet speeds are limited by the copper wire which is used to transport data to and from your home. NBN will raise the bar by using fibre-optic cables to transport data at almost the speed of light.

In addition to speed, another advantage which fibre-optic cables have over the traditional copper wires is that fibre-optic cables are far less susceptible to effects of wet weather, lightning, and erosion; providing users with a more stable and reliable connection.

On this page there is a 'Can I get the NBN?' section which displays the rollout map. Enter your address into the rollout map to see if the NBN is available at your property or if it isn't it will give you an idea of the status of the rollout.
ADSL2+ connections will eventually be replaced by the fibre optic NBN. You will be notified 18 months prior to your ADSL2+ service disconnection date at your property. To beat the rush, it is recommended that you sign up to a suitable NBN plan soon after your NBN infrastructure is ready for use.
Cable internet connections (HFC) will eventually be replaced by the fibre optic NBN. You will be notified 18 months prior to your cable service disconnection date at your property. To beat the rush, it is recommended that you sign up to a suitable NBN plan soon after your NBN infrastructure is ready for use.
Yes, if you have an ADSL2+ or Cable connection you have to change to the NBN. Your existing service will be disconnected 18 months after the NBN is available. So if you do not move to the NBN you will not be able to access the internet after this time.

Traditional corded home phones don’t rely on the electricity at your property to run, so when there is a power outage you can still make and receive calls. This may not be the case once you’re on the NBN with a VoIP home phone, however it depends on the type of NBN connection you have:

  • FTTP: If you have a FTTP connection, your NBN connection box may have its own backup power supply. This can keep your VoIP home phone running during short electricity outages, however the backup power supply is limited. If your electricity is cut off for more than a few hours, the backup power supply will run out of power and you won’t be able to make or receive calls until the electricity comes back on.
  • FTTN/ FTTB: These types of NBN connections don’t get set up with a back up power supply, so if the electricity goes out you won’t be able to make or receive phone calls. This includes emergency calls to 000.
  • Fixed Wireless: If you have a VoIP home phone connected over the NBN, your home phone won’t work during a power outage.
    Traditional cordless home phones need power, so they won’t work in a power outage either.
    If you have a corded landline connected to the copper network, your phone will continue to work during a power outage.

When your FTTP or Fixed wireless NBN service gets connected, an NBN co technician will need to install equipment both inside and outside your home. It is recommended that your internal equipment is installed in a location:

  • Where there is an accessible powerpoint within 1.5 meters
  • Away from any wet areas like showers, sinks, kitchens, bathrooms etc.
  • Which is easy to access

In general, your NBN technician will choose the installation point for the external equipment.

FTTN/ FTTB connections won’t require a technician to install equipment at your property (most of the time) so you’ll just need to plug your modem/ gateway into the phone connection socket. If you have multiple phone sockets at your property, it’s best to install the modem at whichever socket is most central, or closest to the main areas where the internet will be used. That way the wi-fi signal from your modem has less barriers to reach your laptop/ mobile/ tablet device. If you don’t have any phone sockets at your property, you’ll need a technician to install one.

The NBN will introduce new technology which may not be compatible with your back-to-base security alarm system. There are a various types of alarms which work in different ways. Your alarm provider will be in the best position to provide specific advice on your alarm system’s compatibility with the NBN.
Nothing will happen to your Foxtel service when the NBN rolls out in your area. Only the internet carrying component of the cable (HFC) network will be switched off. So even if your Foxtel is carried over the cable network, it will still continue to function as normal.
TV streaming services which are transmitted over the internet will work the same way on the NBN as they do on your existing ADSL or Cable service. If you’re moving from an ADSL connection to the NBN, it’s possible that the quality and speed of your TV streaming services could be improved.
If your area is getting NBN Fixed Wireless, your landline which operates over the existing copper network won’t be affected; it will continue to work as it does now. For all other NBN types, your copper home phone will be disconnected approximately 18 months after the NBN rolls out to your area. If you need/ want to have a home phone, you’ll need to switch over to an NBN home phone before the copper network gets disconnected.

It depends on the type of NBN connection available to you.

If you’re getting a FTTP connection and NBN hasn’t been connected at the property before, a technician will need to install some NBN equipment inside the property. Someone over the age of 18 will need to be home for the installation appointment.

Other types of NBN connections (such as FTTN and FTTB) generally won’t require a technician to install equipment inside your property, therefore you won’t need to be home.

When you sign up to a NBN plan your chosen internet service provider will confirm whether or not you need to be home for an installation appointment.

It depends on which internet service provider you sign up with. Some providers are able to ‘port’ your existing phone number over to the NBN, however there are other providers which will have to give you a new phone number. Call us to find if you can keep your phone number.