• When the device you’re using is having trouble connecting to the internet, check to see if it’s the only one or if all the devices in your home are having similar problems.
  • Depending on your NBN connection type, check if DSL and internet lights in your router are green.
  • If your connection problem is outside your home network, you can visit TPG’s service status page and see if there are any relevant issues.

No matter how fast and convenient your internet connection may be, there will still be times when you’ll encounter connectivity issues. This may be frustrating, but it’s nothing too serious, not to mention it’s to be expected. The truth is, internet connection can be unpredictable, but when problems pop up, it’s fairly easy to troubleshoot the source. Once you’ve done that, it’s just a matter of fixing it - if you can, that is. 

 

If you’ve chosen TPG itself as your internet service provider (ISP), you’ll know that it focuses on providing reliable service - especially during the evening - at competitive prices. But that doesn’t mean they’re infallible. The internet access they provide can still go down; when that happens, there are three possible causes. The issue could lie with your home network, the device you’re using, or with your provider. 

 

Given all that, here are some tips you can use to correct any issues you experience with your TPG NBN connection.  

 

Identify the Problem

 

As mentioned earlier, the first step to solving connection problems is to pinpoint just what is causing them. When the device you’re using is having trouble connecting to the internet, check to see if it’s the only one or if all the devices in your home are having similar problems. If it’s the former, then the issue isn’t your internet, but that specific device. In such cases, reset the device’s network adapter and see if that fixes the problem. 

 

If you find it’s the latter, though, then you have a few more things to do, because the issue may be in your home network, TPG’s network, or the NBN itself. 

 

Troubleshoot Your Router

 

When you signed up with TPG, it’s likely that you received a wireless four-port NBN modem-router that’s been preconfigured. The first step to troubleshooting this device is to check the lights. Depending on your NBN connection type - Fibre-to-the-Curb, Fibre-to-the-Basement, or Fibre-to-the-Node - pay special attention to the DSL and internet lights, both of which should be green. 

 

A general rule of thumb to follow? When one or both lights are red, or neither is lit, then that’s bad news. 

 

Sometimes, all you need to do is power cycle the modem-router or any other networking equipment you have. Otherwise, call TPG to inform them of a connection issue. Power cycling, or turning the router off for about a minute then powering it back on, usually fixes router issues. Otherwise, someone at TPG can walk you through a few more technical steps to try and fix the problem.

 

Check For Outages

 

Did you know that TPG has a page set up specifically to help users check whether or not there’s an outage affecting their respective areas? If you think your connection problem is caused by something outside your home network, you can visit TPG’s service status page and see if there are any relevant issues you need to know about. 

 

If you find that there is, in fact, an outage, you can click the link next to the type of TPG internet connection you have, whether NBN or otherwise. This will allow you to check further for current outages, those that occurred in the last day, and any planned maintenance - which is very likely to lead to an outage in the future. Take note that it might take a while for you to scroll through the list to find an outage that’s affecting your area, though. 

 

Once you find that there’s a recorded outage, check the accompanying information to see when it started as well as its estimated restoration time and date. Keep an eye on the colour used to record the outage, too, since TPG uses a colour coding system to convey the severity. Green is the least worrisome, since it indicates planned or scheduled maintenance. Yellow is somewhere in the middle, since it means there’s an outage but it’s intermittent. If you see blue or red, though, you’re dealing with either a major or a critical outage, respectively. 

 

You can also check for NBN outages by checking NBN Co’s dedicated page. Just type in your address and then click the yellow ‘Check address’ button. You’ll be able to see if there’s an outage in your area, or see if any network maintenance has been planned in the next ten days.

 

In cases like this, there’s not much you can do except wait for the connection to be restored. The upside is, at least you know exactly what’s going on and what made your connection go down in the first place.