What is the difference between ADSL2+ and cable broadband?

  • ADSL2+ and Cable Broadband are connections that are pretty fast - running at speeds of up to 24Mbps for ADSL2+ and up to 30Mbps for Cable Broadband
  • ADSL2+ connections run on underground copper phone lines and come into your home via a jack in the wall.
  • Cable broadband is a connection that runs on a coaxial cable up to the pillar (or node) in your street, and then travels via fibre optic cable thereafter.

There have been quite a few people that we have recently spoken to that don’t actually know the true difference between ADSL2+ and Cable Broadband. Well, to be honest, we don’t blame you - the average person has too many things to worry about in a day than to pay attention to all things internet. However, if you are someone who is looking for the answer to the ADSL2+ vs Cable Broadband answer, then you’ve come to the right place.

First of all, both ADSL2+ and Cable Broadband are connections that are pretty fast - running at speeds of up to 24Mbps for ADSL2+ and up to 30Mbps for Cable Broadband, but keep in mind that the means to which they enter your home come via different mediums. Read on to find out more about what exactly ADSL2+ and Cable Broadband is, and the differences between the two.

ADSL2+

ADSL2+ connections run on underground copper phone lines and come into your home via a jack in the wall. Should you want to use the telephone and your internet connection at the same time, you will need to plug both your ADSL2+ modem and telephone into two ports on a line filter which usually comes with your modem at no extra cost. ADSL2+ connections run at speeds of up to 24Mbps, but do keep in mind that your internet speed is highly dependant on how close your abode is to the nearest telephone exchange. The further you are, the slower your internet speeds are going to be.

ADSL2+ connections are available without a phone service if you set up Naked DSL connection. Such an ADSL2+ service will still run on a phone line, but you will not be able to use a telephone service, and thus will not have to pay for an additional phone bill. ADSL2+ uses an ADSL2+ modem, which may or may not also be connected to a wireless router, allowing you to create a Wi-Fi network within your home.

ADSL2+ is actually the most common form of super-fast broadband that currently available in the country, with heaps of competition in the industry from numerous different Internet ISPs. ADSL2+ will also be the cheapest option for you when it comes to connecting to the internet, should it be available in your area. Phone exchanges that are enabled for ADSL2+ usually begin in the middle of the city and move outwards through and into metropolitan areas. ISPs enable ADSL2+ services where they think they will make their revenue back on the investment of installing their own DSLAM equipment into a phone exchange. Thus, we find that densely populated areas get connected to ADSL2+ a lot faster than outer suburbs or regional areas in Australia.

When it comes to copper wire telephone infrastructures in Australia, Telstra and Optus are the main two contenders. Due to Telstra once being a government-owned company (Telecom), its network is a lot more extensive than Optus’. A variety of ISPs even pays to put their equipment in either Telstra/Optus phone exchanges in order to be able to service an area.

On the occasions where you will be unable to get ADSL2+ infrastructure due to infrastructure issues in your street such as pair gains, RIMs and sub-exchanges (or even if you live too far away from the exchange), you will most likely be able to receive an ADSL1 service, as is the case in regional or less populated locations.

Cable Broadband 

Cable broadband is a connection that runs on a coaxial cable up to the pillar (or node) in your street and then travels via fibre optic cable thereafter. This is the same kind of connection that brings cable TV services such as Foxtel Broadband to your home.Cable Broadband runs at impressive speeds of up to 30Mbps, but speeds do increase at a faster rate than that of ADSL2+, the further you get away from the node.

Broadband connections via cable entail having the appropriate infrastructure in your location, and this is most common in metro areas around Australia. Because there is far less competition in the cable broadband market, your main providers will most likely either be BigPond or Optus.

Cable Broadband also requires a special cable modem and cable wiring into your home or business. This usually will cost you more than it would set up ADSL2+ internet but is usually worth the extra costs as Cable Broadband is a reliable and stable connection. You can also use a wireless router to create a Wi-Fi network within your home. Another one of the disadvantages of Cable Broadband besides slightly higher costs and fast diminishing speeds is that has rather slow upload speeds in comparison to ADSL2+.

You can have a cable TV connection that runs simultaneously on your broadband cable, as well as a telephone line should you want one. If you do not have a copper phone line/telephone on your cable service, then you have a Naked Cable broadband connection.

In the case that you are able to get fibre optic broadband, you should definitely go for it. However, if you can’t, your best bet is to go for ADSL2+, and should this be unavailable in your area, then look towards cable broadband. However, if even cable broadband is not an option for your area, then ADSL1 will be your best choice. If even ADSL1 is unavailable (oh dear!), then you will have to look for mobile wireless broadband. Almost done, almost done! Finally, if mobile wireless broadband is also unavailable, you will have to get a satellite broadband connection.

 

Should you have any queries about ADSL2+ or Cable Broadband, do not hesitate to call us today or drop us an email and we will get back to you in a jiffy. Cheers!